Everything You Need To Know About Clubhouse

A low-down on the app du jour, Clubhouse: an invite-only, podcast party mashup, perfect for giving people an audible soapbox. But, is that a good thing?

Clubhouse has already secured special guest content creators like Elon Musk, Mark Zuckerberg and (potentially) Kanye West. Chances are, it’s probably doing pretty well for itself.

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People are calling it the “Soho House of social”. Clubhouse is sort of like an exclusive podcast party.

What Even Is Clubhouse?

If you don’t already know, people are calling it the “Soho House of social”. Clubhouse is sort of like an exclusive podcast party. The app is invite-only, but once you’re in, you can hop into any room where people are chatting, create a new public room, or create a private room. Groups of people chat with a few moderators. To speak, you raise your hand and wait your turn – a little like school! There’s no video, no text-based chat (it’s strictly audio based, for now).

The app provides big opportunity for intimate discussions, panel events and networking. And, just like a phone call, once the conversation is over, the room is closed and the live audio-chats disappear. The idea is that it can mimic real-life interactions. New social platforms with similar aims emerge fairly often, but few stick like this app du jour.

How To Get Going

To have a valuable – and controllable – Clubhouse experience, you have to be tactical with who you follow. When you join, you select topics of interest, like tech, books, business or health. The more information you give the more conversation rooms and individuals the app will recommend you follow or join.

If you’re a creator who’s got something to say, you’ll be pleased to learn about Clubhouse’s latest plans. The app has confirmed it will be introducing products to help creators on the platform get paid, including subscriptions, tipping and ticket sales. This funding round will also support a “Creator Grant Program” being set up by Clubhouse, which will be used to “support emerging Clubhouse creators” according to the start-up’s blog post.

“The app has confirmed it will be introducing products to help creators on the platform get paid, including subscriptions, tipping and ticket sales.”

5 Clubs And Folk To Follow On Clubhouse

To get you off to a running-start, here are some of Connects’ teams favourite British follows on the Clubhouse app…

+ Marketing – a roundtable discussion on the latest trends within the marketing space, good campaigns and worthy advice.

+ Black Girls Book Club – founded with one mission in mind: to create a space for Black womxn and girls to be themselves, unapologetically, and of course to live their best literary lives!

+ Slow Sustainable Business – a club for entrepreneurs who are busy building sustainable empires.

+ Empowered – entrepreneurs, small-biz owners, online educators, coaches, podcasters and pretty much anyone you can imagine who wants to become financially empowered.

+ Mental Health Matters – a group for elevating topics and conversation around mental health, moderated by doctors.

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+ Marketing
+ Black Girls Book Club
+ Slow Sustainable Business
+ Empowered
+ Mental Health Matters

Is It Worth The Hype?

The jury is still out on this one.

There is the argument that Clubhouse slips perfectly into the ever-growing trend of audio communication. The use of audible messaging facilities are becoming more popular with the increased use of hands-free devices like AirPods, or hassle-free communication in the form of WhatsApp voice notes. Additionally, the CEO and co-founder of Yac (a competitor app to Clubhouse) said that “audio removes the Zoom fatigue problem”.

That all being said, Clubhouse definitely has some teething problems to figure out first. Our MD recently did her first Clubhouse event, so weighing-in on her experience, this is what she had to say:

“It definitely felt as described; a chaotic 90s dinner party, combined with the medium of podcasting. And honestly? I’m not sure I’m a fan. Maybe that means I’m getting old (who said that), or maybe it’s just because I’m a people person. Whenever I’m recording podcasts (virtually or IRL) it’s the eye contact, the social cues, the presence and the energy from the interaction that sways the conversation. I think all those things make for better content. On Clubhouse, you don’t get any of that. You’re talking at your phone. You can’t work out whether people are engaged or not. And, if you’re easily distracted like me, you zone out almost immediately.” (Sedge Beswick)

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It definitely felt as described; a chaotic 90s dinner party, combined with the medium of podcasting.

So, Can Brands Get Involved?

It’s not really a case of ‘can’, but instead, an opportunity for you to find out whether you ‘should’ through experiencing the app. If the vibe fits your brand’s intentions authentically, why not? There’s huge scope for influencers, celebrities, founders – and so on – to host all sorts of things.

Our reckoning, is that in order to run a successful Clubhouse event, with no talking over one another, you need:

+ A clear strategy going into it

+ A visible host

+ And a goal of what you want to get out of the session.

If you’re interested in hosting an event on Clubhouse and think we could help, or fancy a more general foray in the world of influencer marketing, drop us a line at info@seenconnects.com – we’d be happy to chat.